Subscribe To The Weaving Influence Newsletter  
  
  Sign up & get updates via email

Blog

When Your Day Begins with a Mistake

| | Weaving Influence | 8 Comments

I have a habit of completely unplugging at night to be more focused on my family and give myself a break from the busy pace of my work day.

If I hear a text come through, I will sometimes walk to the phone to read it. I ignore email, Twitter, and Facebook; 13 hours of immersion and connection is enough.

This is a strategy that works quite well for me. My team knows I unplug at night, and no clients have complained (yet.)

Enter: a training call that I scheduled last night for 8 pm ET.

It’s funny, in this case, I don’t remember hearing the calendar alert. And I know why — at 8 pm, I was still upstairs, finishing my girls’ bedtime routines. My phone, downstairs, on the charger.

So, I woke up to an email from the delightful CEO of Maestro Market, Ian Shea, asking me about our planned Go to Meeting, the one I scheduled and then forgot.

My day began with a realization of a mistake.

What could I do? Go back to bed (tempting), cover up for my mistake (my first thought was that it had to be a calendar malfunction.)

Here’s the only thing to do.

Admit it. (Wow, I messed up. I know your time is important.)

Apologize. Look for a way to make it right. (I’m sorry. Can we reschedule at a time that’s convenient for you?)

Move on.

In my case, I am moving on to a busy day. The pace will be hectic; I’ll need to stay focused and present. I’ll need to bring my best, do my best, give my best.

There’s no time for feeling sorry for myself, or beating myself up.

I have made mistakes before. I will make mistakes again. I may mess up bigger than this later today, although I don’t plan to.

Instead, I’ll pray for grace in each moment, for these moments — TODAY — is the only day I have.

Tell me something! What do you do when your day begins with a mistake?

Maestro Market is your connection to hand-picked experts. From their website: “Maestro Market is a unique and first-of-its-kind platform that connects people with their ideal experts, or even their heroes. This exciting new platform facilitates a variety of engagements, whether in-person, over Skype, via telephone, etc., between talented experts and anyone interested in learning a skill, solving a problem, getting inspired, gifting an experience or indulging a desire. The experts span numerous categories including parenting,writingwomen in businesssocial mediabloggingentrepreneurship, and many more.” Check out my offerings at Maestro Market

Be Sociable, Share!

About The Author

I am the owner of Weaving Influence and the leader of the Weaving Influence team. We help authors and thought leaders grow their online influence. I am also a wife and mom of three daughters, and I enjoy running, reading, writing, a good cup of coffee, and dark chocolate.

Join The Conversation

What People Are Saying

J KAM   |   06 February 2013   |   Reply

I realize I just woke up to “a learning opportunity”, assuming this same event only happens(ed) once! Pick myself up, figure out what happened & why, and make a change, if necessary.

Becky Robinson   |   07 February 2013   |   Reply

Great perspective. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

Molly   |   06 February 2013   |   Reply

Thanks for setting a great example! Admit, Apologize, Move on. I need to remember this.

Becky Robinson   |   07 February 2013   |   Reply

Don’t forget: make it right. (Thus, my not so subtle shout-out to Ian and his company.)

Steven Records   |   06 February 2013   |   Reply

Great post Becky. I think moving on can be the hardest part as is admitting it, especially to someone other than yourself.

Becky Robinson   |   07 February 2013   |   Reply

I guess I got over that quickly by admitting it to the whole world (or the 17 people who read my blog, lol).

Jane   |   07 February 2013   |   Reply

I spend a little time wondering what just happened. Then I forgive myself so I can move on. Then I figure out what has to be done to resolve the issue. If it affects others, make it right with them too. Decide how to prevent it from happening again. Get back on the horse and ride.

David Kanigan   |   09 February 2013   |   Reply

Yes, on point Becky. The sooner you can address is, the sooner you can clear your heart and head and move on. Great post.