How to Connect Students to Online Learning Resources

How to Connect Students to Online Learning Resources

Online resources can enhance and enrich learning for students at all levels. In addition, by connecting learners to online resources, instructors give students a way to continue learning throughout their lifetimes.

But where do you start?

As I wrote in the last post of this series, instructors who want to incorporate online learning need to make two important commitments. As instructors,we must become active learners and model expected behaviors for our students.

Some of us may already be involved in online learning. If you are new to reading blogs and finding learning tools online, you may want to allow yourself a learning period of several months so that you can become comfortable with your new habits before you begin to incorporate them into your teaching.

Here are my top seven ideas about how to find the best learning resources for your field of study.

  1. SmartBrief. Have you discovered it? SmartBrief aggregates content for over 100 different industries, compiling the best, most current, and most relevant content into free e-newsletters. Find the one that most closely fits your subject area and subscribe.  Because each SmartBrief draws from a variety of online sources, you can click on headlines that interest you in the newsletter to discover online journals, blogs, and other resources.
  2. AllTop. Alltop allows you search for lists of blogs by topic. You can also gather all your favorite blogs, with recent posts listed, on one page.
  3. Online versions of your favorite print magazines and journals. Look for info you may already be reading in print online. The online versions may be easily searchable, and you will be able to share links to great articles with your students.
  4. Google. When we started the LeaderTalk blog, I searched for “Best Leadership Blogs.” In doing so, I found several “Best of” Lists. I used those lists and browsed various blogs until I found a few favorites.
  5. Blogrolls. A blogroll is a list of a blogger’s favorite blogs. Typically, a blogger will include other blogs that are similar to their own. Once you find a few blogs you like, check to see if they have a blogroll, and click the links to browse those blogs.
  6. Twitter. I will another post detailing how to use Twitter to find online learning resources.  Although it takes time to learn how to use Twitter, once you do, you will find it to be an invaluable asset to your learning.
  7. LinkedIn. I’ll share some specific ideas in another post, but LinkedIn is a great place to connect with experts and learn by asking and answering questions.

Join the conversation!

What are your favorite online learning resources?

How did you discover them?

This was originally posted at Mountain State University LeaderTalk and is reposted with permission. 

Filed As:  resources, online

About Becky Robinson

I am the owner of Weaving Influence and the leader of the Weaving Influence team. We help authors and thought leaders grow their online influence. I am also a wife and mom of three daughters, and I enjoy running, reading, writing, a good cup of coffee, and dark chocolate.

Share This Article

What People Are Saying

  • Under the subheading of Google, blogsearch.google.com searches through RSS feeds for relevant topics. Scholar.google.com does the same for peer-reviewed research. Both are Quite handy.

  • I agree these are all great resources for students. I also use bx.businessweek.com for business related articles and content as well as technorati.com for many different article topics.

  • I use http://www.bizjournals.com/, Real Clear Markets, Google news for day-to-day info. But I also appreciate taped sessions on YouTube, TED, and FORA.tv websites to keep up with what thought leaders are saying at various conferences.

Add A Comment

Join us for an exclusive webinar!

Learn about our services, marketing insights, events, and opportunities