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All of our book marketing efforts have one goal…to sell books.  There are thousands of books published each year which means getting a book to stand-out in a cluttered market takes creativity and tenacity.

We recommend a strong book page or website, a vibrant and consistent social presence, digital advertising, public relations outreach, and more.  We also recommend collateral-that’s marketing speak for branded materials.

While there’s no clear ROI, there is research that shows consumers trust printed collateral 55% more than other types of marketing which is why we often recommend bookmarks and postcards to clients who send out books to a launch team, or to clients who do a lot of speaking.  Leaving an audience with something tangible can help drive awareness and book sales. 

Traditional collateral items work, but sometimes, you need something a little more memorable. Depending on the audience for a book,  there is a world of creative, fun collateral items that will keep people talking about (and buying) a book.  

Taking a page from the world of running,  t-shirts and other wearables are a sought after collateral item.  Most authors send launch team members an advance copy of their book, but sending them a t-shirt, too, could drive more engagement and greater participation.  I’m imagining a Got Motvation? t-shirt now!

A client of ours has an upcoming book focused on strategy.  He’s created promotional poker chips to go out with his books.  He also plans to give these out at speaking engagements.  It’s a fun item and sure to get people talking about and remembering his book.  

Flashlights, coffee mugs, drink tumblers, golf balls…the list of items available for branding is nearly limitless.  Using these items to thank a launch team,  as a giveaway at speaking events, or on social media,  creates excitement and interest, and could be just the thing to cut through the book glut and get your title noticed.

Collateral is an investment but we think it’s often a great way to drive long-term interest, loyalty, and ultimately, sell some books.